Arbor Valley Academy Course Offerings

Arbor Valley Academy uses Edgenuity® Courseware, offering a comprehensive and complete educational experience with AP®, honors, and electives for high school students.

Our online courses and curriculum are built using an instructional model grounded in research and aligned to state standards, the Common Core, and the NGSS. We combine direct-instruction videos featuring expert, on-screen teachers with rigorous assignments, performance tasks, and assessments to engage students and ensure subject-area mastery.

Below is just a selection of our Course Offerings.

English Courses

  1. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9
    1. Targeted at students in their first year of high school. Students will engage with a range of classical texts and contemporary texts. They will read, evaluate and analyze works of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction. Assignments and lessons will strengthen oral skills, as well as develop concise and coherent writing.
  2. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10
    1. This course is focused on the direct application and further development of literary analysis skills. Each unit focuses on a specific literary analysis skill and it’s applications on various genres of literature. Sources and texts will range from literary non-fiction, e-resources, and education interactives. This course also has a focus on media literacy and computer skills. Students will also compose a variety of essays.
  3. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11
    1. This course delves into American literature with a focus on the works of many great writers. Students will engage with texts in the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction and will engage in comprehensive literary analysis and evaluation of the texts.
  4. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12
    1. This course has a strong focus on British literature spanning across history. This course examines the connections between the literature and the time periods of the works by analyzing philosophical, political, and social influences present within the texts. In addition, some literature from India, China, and Spain will also be explored.
  5. AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION
    1. This is a fast-paced college-level course that prepares students for the AP exam. Students will engage in critical thinking, reading, writing, and discussions while exploring multiple variations and genres of prose. The course has a strong focus on writing expository, analytical and argumentative essays. Students will be given practice assessments for the AP exam throughout the year.
  6. AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
    1. A fast-paced college-level course that prepares students for the AP exam. Students learn how to analyze and comment on an author’s or genre’s usage of style and literary devices. Students will interpret meaning based on form; examine characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.
  7. LITERACY & COMPREHENSION I
    1. An intervention course designed to support the development of reading and writing skills. Diverse, interesting content and real-life applications help engage students. The course offers an interface that helps students gain proficiency in comprehension strategies such as summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. The course uses self-evaluation to inspire students to take control of their learning.
  8. LITERACY & COMPREHENSION II
    1. The second section of “Literacy & Comprehension”, aimed at students reading 2-3 levels below their grade. The course exposes students to diverse and engaging content areas to develop proficiency in comprehension strategies such as summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. The course uses self-evaluation to inspire students to take control of their learning.
  9. EXPOSITORY READING AND WRITING
    1. An elective English course designed to develop reading and writing skills to college standards. This course has an emphasis on critically reading expository and persuasive texts, but students will also explore some fiction, poetry, and drama.
  10. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIONS AND SPEECH
    1. This one-semester course examines the characteristics of human communication in verbal and nonverbal manifestations. Areas of culture, gender, self-awareness, perception, and communication will be explored through lectures and activities. Students will learn to analyze and critique speeches.
  11. CLASSIC NOVELS AND AUTHOR STUDIES
    1. This mini-course allows students the opportunity to fully explore a large work of fiction. Designed to stand-alone or to be inserted into an existing course.

Math

  1. PRE-ALGEBRA
    1. This full-year course is designed for those that have completed Middle School math but are not ready for Algebra. The course reviews Algebra skills and begins to introduce basic Algebra I content. Concepts of numbers and operations, expressions, ratios and proportions, and basic functions are explored.
  2. ALGEBRA I
    1. This full-year course focuses on five subject areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. Students will interpret, analyze, and compare functions from various presentations all while strengthening math reasoning and solving.
  3. GEOMETRY
    1. This course explores geometry at a high school level. The course has a strong focus on mathematical reasoning in the form of proofs and geometric constructions. Students learn a variety of triangle concepts, from congruency to trigonometry. Students will also learn how to derive geometric formulas from 2D shapes. The course progresses into combining algebra and geometry in the concepts of special triangles, and coordinate plane connections. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis.
  4. ALGEBRA II
    1. This course’s content explores functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. Students will present knowledge and solve problems using a variety of methods: verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations. As students expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and properties of real numbers, complex numbers, and algebraic expressions.
  5. PRE-CALCULUS
    1. Pre-calculus prepares students for Calculus. The course briefly reviews material from Algebra and then moves towards intense study of function families (polynomial, rational, exponential, trigonometric and logarithmic), matrices, vectors, probability, and statistics.
  6. AP® CALCULUS AB
    1. This is a fast-paced college-level course that prepares students for the AP exam.  The content will review pre-calculus and then cover limits, derivatives, definite integrals, mathematical modeling of differential equations, and the applications of these concepts. Problems will be solved and expressed numerically, graphically, verbally, and analytically.
  7. MATHEMATICS I
    1. This course reviews and advances middle school math skills at the high school level. The course cements an understanding of relationships between quantities, lines, equations, and inequalities. Students learn transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane. Students will also learn multi-step equations, mathematical reasoning, and analyzation of data.
  8. MATHEMATICS II
    1. This course explores radicals, polynomials, quadratic functions, probability, geometry (with an emphasis on right triangles and circles). Students will strengthen their mathematical reasoning and aptitude.
  9. MATHEMATICS III
    1. This course synthesizes mathematical knowledge from the areas of: statistics and data, algebraic studies of functions, integer properties, triangle trigonometry, logarithms, and real-life applications of mathematical knowledge. As they synthesize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.
  10. MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS
    1. Using mathematical knowledge acquired in Algebra I, students will use math to model real-world problems and experiences in the area of finance. Financial topics include growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models.
  11. FINANCIAL MATH
    1. This course uses mathematical concepts to develop understanding in financial math for both personal and business settings. This course contains an emphasis on math skills such as, percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems and exponential functions that leads way to project-based learning activities covering topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data.
  12. CONCEPTS IN PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
    1. This is a full-year math credit for students who don’t want to pursue advanced math (Algebra II and Pre-Calc). The course comprehensively studies probability and data analysis. Students will learn to apply probability in the areas of conditional probability, combinations and permutations, and sets. Students will also create and analyze scatterplots, two-way tables, and distributions.
  13. TRIGONOMETRY*
    1. This one-semester class begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle and extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. Students are also familiarized with the laws of sines and cosines, exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s theorem.

Science

  1. EARTH SCIENCE
    1. Students will learn everything about the Earth’s science from basic rock structure to climate change. This is a two-semester course that provides a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and examines how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.
  2. PHYSICAL SCIENCE
  3. BIOLOGY
    1. This two-semester course teaches students about living organisms while examining the biology and biochemistry of the world around us. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on labs and virtual labs.
  4. CHEMISTRY
    1. This full-year course examines chemistry both conceptually and in the context of the world. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the study of matter (it’s composition, reactions, and impacts), electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications.
  5. PHYSICS
    1. This full-year course teaches students a conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Students will apply knowledge mathematically and abstractly. Students also have labs.
  6. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
    1. This two-semester course explores multiple areas of environmental science, including ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Most of the learning will be tied to real-life situations and scientific theory.
  7. AP® ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
    1. This college-level course is laboratory- and field-based teaching students the content and skills needed to understand interrelationships in the natural world. The course covers human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law.

Social Studies

  1. SURVEY OF WORLD HISTORY
    1. This yearlong course covers major historical events in the world from ancient to present times. Students will investigate classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia by exploring the economic, political and social revolutions that impact modern history. Students will use primary and secondary sources to evaluate historical events and understand multiple perspectives. Students will also pick up on recurring themes through which they will draw connections to modern-day.
  2. MODERN WORLD HISTORY
    1. This yearlong course studies major events of world history from the Enlightenment to the present day. Students will investigate the ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia by exploring the economic, political and social revolutions that impact modern history. Students will use primary and secondary sources to evaluate historical events and understand multiple perspectives. Students will also pick up on recurring themes through which they will draw connections to modern-day. Students will also complete a variety of written assignments.
  3. SURVEY OF U.S. HISTORY
    1. This yearlong course studies the major events in US history from the Era of Exploration to modern-day. Students will use primary and secondary sources to evaluate historical events and understand the factors that shaped US history. The course will overview the foundation of democracy, the effects of territorial expansion, the civil war, cultural diversity, economic trends and industrialization. Students will end with a focus on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age.
  4. U.S. HISTORY I
    1. This yearlong course explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course covers the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, examining the major events that shaped US history. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World. As students study early U.S. history, they will examine the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. Themes of territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of their contribution to the Civil War and Reconstruction.
  5. US HISTORY II
    1. This yearlong course examines the major events in US history from the Industrial Revolution to modern-day. As students study the history, they will become aware of patterns and the impact that dynamic leadership, economic &  political change played in the rise of US global prominence. Students will also focus on the importance of cultural and political movements in the creation of modern society.
  6. AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY
    1. This college-level course examines the history of the United States from the New World to modern-day. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students will also engage with primary and secondary sources to examine historical scholarship and understanding.
  7. U.S. GOVERNMENT*
    1. This is a semester-long course that covers the basic principles and procedures of the US government. The course will evaluate the founding principles of the government, comprehensively review the Consitution and amendments, the extension of civil rights and liberties. Students will also examine major Supreme Court decisions to evaluate the importance of constitutional rights. Students learn about public policy and the role citizens play in the civic process. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources. Students will also be tasked with writing assignments.
  8. AP® UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS*
    1. This one-semester college-level course is designed to prepare students for the AP United States Government and Politics exam. Students will study the Constitutional underpinnings and structure of the United States government, issues of politics and political parties, and topics in civil rights and public policy, demonstrating their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, project-based activities, and practice exams.
  9. ECONOMICS
    1.  Available as either a semester or a full year, this course teaches economic concepts and how they apply to everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Students analyze data displays and write for assignments based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. Students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.
  10. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
    1. This course examines current global issues and their impact on our world today. The course covers the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Students will develop geographic skills such as interpreting maps, analyzing data, and comparing theories. Students will also come to understand the development of modern civilizations, human systems and economic systems spanning from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution.
  11. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
    1. Human Geography is a college-level course designed to prepare students for the AP Human Geography Exam. The goal of the course is to provide students with a geographic perspective through which to view the world. Through a combination of direct instruction, documentary videos, and online readings, students will cover the topics of population, culture, political organization of space, agricultural land use, industrialization, and urban land use. Students will demonstrate their understanding through essays, document-based questions, student collaborative activities, and practice AP exams.
  12. AP® PSYCHOLOGY
    1. This college-level course teaches students the systematic study of behavior and mental processes of humans and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena in the major fields of psychology. Students also learn about the methods psychologists use in their field. In addition, this course has been designed to help students successfully achieve a passing score on the AP Psychology exam.
  13. AP® WORLD HISTORY: MODERN
    1. This college-level course explores historical themes common to societies around the world, from 1200 to the present day. Emphasis is placed on document analysis, historical thinking skills, reasoning processes, and essay writing. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, document-based questions, project-based activities, and practice exams.

General Electives

  1. INTRODUCTION TO ART*
    1. This one-semester course provides an overview of the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology, principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, students also explore the time periods and places of prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.
  2. ART HISTORY I*
    1. This one-semester course studies and evaluates art across the years through a multi-disciplinary approach. The course progresses through different regions of the world in chronological order. The course covers art from the 12th to 19th in all parts of the world. Distinctive movements studied include Romanesque, High Renaissance and Baroque art and world art.
  3. CONTEMPORARY HEALTH
    1. Available as either a semester or year-long course, this course examines various health topics. The course places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships, and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Students will examine plans they can implement in their own life, and study how to develop emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family. This course also covers sex and gender identity.
  4. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION BUNDLE
    1. This bundle includes three courses. Foundations of Personal Wellness is a full-year offering that combines health and fitness instruction. Two separate semester-long courses are also included: Healthy Living, which focuses exclusively on personal health but in a more conservative and traditional treatment than Contemporary Health, and Lifetime Fitness, which is a one-semester physical education course.
  5. ONLINE LEARNING AND DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP*
    1. This one semester course provides a comprehensive introduction to online learning. It teaches students safe online practices, how to work independently, and effective study habits for an online learning environment. The course provides important study skills such as time management, effective note-taking, test preparation, and collaborating effectively online. By the end of the course, students will understand what it takes to be successful online learners and responsible digital citizens.
  6. PSYCHOLOGY
    1. This year long course covers the fundamental concepts of psychology. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. The course establishes an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning and cognitive development, the stages of human development, personality and intelligence, the classification and treatment of psychological disorders, and psychological aspects of social interactions.
  7. SOCIOLOGY*
    1. This one semester course delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. The course covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.
  8. STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS*
    1. This one semester course establishes different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles to push students to pursue successful learning. Students will identify what works best for them individually, as they learn important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

WORLD LANGUAGES

  1. SPANISH I
    1. This introductory Spanish course covers the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concept. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, and writing.
  2. SPANISH II
    1. This course develops the skills established in Spanish I. The key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking, will be strengthened.  Students, again will use online games to cement these skills.
  3. SPANISH III
    1. This course further develops the skills established in Spanish I and II. Students will focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary and grammar concepts, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
  4. AP® SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE
    1. This is an advanced language course in which students expand their cognitive, analytical, and communication skills. The courses uses the modes of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication. The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students’ posts.
  5. FRENCH I
    1. This course introduces students to French through listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.  Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.
  6. FRENCH II
    1. This course develops the skills established in French I. The key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking, will be strengthened.  Students, again will use online games to cement these skills.
  7. FRENCH III
    1. This course further develops the skills established in French I and II. Students will focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary and grammar concepts, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.
  8. AP® FRENCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE
    1. French Language and Culture is an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical, and communicative skills. The courses uses the modes of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication. The course prepares students for the AP French Language and Culture Exam. The course is designed as an immersion experience requiring the use of French exclusively. The online learning coach only uses French to communicate with students. In addition, all the reading, listening, speaking, and writing is in French. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. The course contains a forum where students share their opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students’ posts. The course makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.
  9. GERMAN I
    1. This introductory German course covers the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.
  10. GERMAN II
    1. Students continue their study of the skills established in German I. The key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking, will be strengthened.  Students, again will use online games to cement these skills.
  11. CHINESE I
    1. This introductory Chinese course covers the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.
  12. CHINESE II
    1. Students in high school continue their introduction to Chinese by developing the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.
  13. LATIN I
    1. This introductory Latin course covers the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.
  14. LATIN II
    1. Students in high school continue their introduction to Latin by developing the four key areas of foreign language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Each unit has an ongoing adventure story, a vocabulary theme, and grammar concepts. The course uses interactive games to teach vocabulary and grammar, comprehension activities, speaking, writing, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments